We’ve been watching an egg cooking.

We’ve been watching a poached egg cooking! Today’s example of an everyday occurrence we take for granted but when watched through the eyes of a child the transformation is magical! ‘How does this happen?’ Most three year olds will appreciate that it’s something to do with hot water.

We’ve no time now but this evening we are going to test that theory by putting one egg into cold water and the other into hot.

Learning about Rain. Art meets Science

Make a rainy day fun by finding out more about rain.

What is rain? What shape do raindrops make in puddles? Why do wet pebbles look shiny?

There are so many questions to find the answers to and so many art and craft projects to continue the theme and explorations.

Follow the link below and watch the short video with your child. Then start to look, to listen, to investigate.

It’s Raining. Art meets Science

Simple answers to those difficult questions:

What is rain?

Rain falls from clouds. Clouds are made from lots and lots of tiny water droplets. These droplets move around and bump into each other They stick together into clumps that get bigger and heavier. Eventually they get so big and heavy they can’t float any more and they fall to the ground as rain.

Why are wet stones and pebbles shiny and darker than dry ones?

The water coats the stone giving it a smooth surface. Light reflects off this surface just like it does in a lake or in the sea.

What shape do raindrops make on puddles?

Rain drops make concentric circles. That is one circle inside another. You can illustrate this by putting a very small plate on a slightly larger one and that on top of a larger one still.

Why do raindrops stay on top of leaves?

Leaves are covered with a kind of waxy coat. Some leaves are more waxy than others. This makes them waterproof and so the raindrops stay on the surface..

Why do raindrops on a window always go down and never up?

its all to do with the pull of gravity. Gravity is like a great big magnet pulling everything down towards the ground. Without gravity we would float in the air and so would all the cars and buses! When raindrops land on the window they are pulled downwards by gravity. As they travel down the window they bump into other drops and be one heavier. The heavier they become the faster they move.,

For related art and craft projects please see the previous two posts. Or search for raindrops and Concentric circles.

Floating Egg Experiment

Why don’t they do this kind of thing at school? By that I mean in  first or primary school.  

If you catch them young so many more children would be interested  in Science! 

Lizzie demonstrates how to make an egg float and delivers a challenge.  

A quick and fun activity to do at home.  Parent supervision is needed. 

Why Science for young children ? 

Why is science important?  

Because it answers all the questions that kids ask like ‘what are clouds?’ and ‘Why is the sky blue’ and ‘Why do bubbles pop?’ 

Because it explains how the world works. Why earthquakes happen. Why we have thunder and lightening. Why we sprinkle salt on icy paths. Why food goes bad. 

Because science helps kids learn to predict, to problem solve, to research. To persevere and be patient. They learn that not everything works first time and that you learn from your mistakes. 

Because they develop their own opinions rather than being contented accepting those of others. 

Through science children learn to think about the outcome of their actions. The possible results. It motivates them to problem solve. To come up with new ideas and maybe new inventions when they grow up. It also gives them a head start in the future since creative thinkers are sought after in every field of work.

Do you like science? Are you interested in science? Do you enjoy helping your child find out the scientific answers behind his questions? Can you think of fun, practical ways to do this ? If your answer is ‘No’ then it’s probably because you had a bad experience in your early years. Perhaps you didn’t enjoy science at school?  

Primary school teachers have a huge responsibility. It is SO important that they are not just confident in their scientific knowledge but that they are really interested in science. If children are taught by people who don’t have a passion for a subject then unfortunately it is very likely that this negativity will be passed on to their young pupils. 

Research shows that children have formed either a positive or negative opinion about science by the time they are seven or eight. Once formed its very difficult to change that opinion. 

This is so sad because all children are born as creative thinkers. As scientists! They are naturally inquisitive. They want find out about the world around them. Through their play children are discovering and problem solving every minute. For them science is exciting and fun! 

So what can we, as parents do? Well, it’s unlikely you will be able to change your child’s teacher! It’s also unlikely that you will be aware of how they are influencing your child. But nurturing a child’s interest in science begins well before they go to school and once established should see them through any negativity. 

After all science is just part of our every day life. Opportunities arise every time you make bread or dry the clothes or make ice cubes or boil an egg or put soap in the bath or wipe condensation off the windows.  


Children are never too young to investigate. Watch them playing in water, in sand, with play dough, colour mixing,  building towers with bricks. Without realising they are testing volume, density, diffusion, balance, temperature, weight and so much more. This is why hands-on play is so important.   

With support and guidance and motivation a pre school child will enjoy trying to find out the answers to their own questions rather than relying and trusting the answers of others. 

But what if you are not interested in science or unsure how to help. If you can’t think of open ended questions or activities which will stimulate their interest? 

There are plenty of books and science kits and internet sites available but beware of those which require buying specialised equipment. There is no need! You probably already have everything you require in your cupboards! Also be wary of any which simply demonstrate how to carry out an investigation and provides the answer! 

Children require programmes to make them think and question.  The link below will take you to a site which does just this. 

            FUN SCIENCE FOR YOUNG CHILDREN

Evaporation with Lizzie Witch

​It was a big washing day today at Jumble House and, because we don’t have a garden, that means clothes hung from every window plus a drier in the bathroom. 

Lizzie Witch saw this as an excellent opportunity to teach us all about evaporation and steam and condensation. 

To watch the programme just click on this link (and please subscribe to our channel):-   Evaporation Programme

Lizzie left us with a challenge  and hear a a couple more: 

1. Water evaporates more quickly when it is warm than when it is cool.  Can you think of a way to,prove that this statement is true? 

2. Take two identical pieces of cloth.  Soak them in water and then squeeze the water out. Place one in a sealed plastic bag and spread the other out on the floor in a sunny place.  What do you think will happen by the same time tomorrow? 

 Check every couple of hours, record what you see and explain the results. 
 

Maisie and the Hedgehog.

It was a lovely Autumn day.

Warm and sunny.

Maisie Jumble was playing in the garden. Maisie liked tumbling around.

She was just about go into a headstand when ………

‘Rustle rustle’

What was that? wondered Maisie.

‘Rustle rustle’

There it was again.

Where was the noise coming from?

Maisie looked up at the trees.

She looked down at the grass.

She looked right and then left.

Where was the noise coming from?

Then, from under the bushes came the

most perculiar little creature.

Can you guess what it was?

Here are some clues.

It was small and roundish.

It had four tiny legs.

It had two eyes and a little pointed face and snout.

It was covered in prickles!

You’ve guessed?

Yes! It was a hedgehog. A very young hedgehog.

Maisie thought it was SO cute!

She wanted to keep it as a pet but knew not to.

It is not kind to keep wild animals as pets.

So, instead, Maisie enjoyed watching it in the garden.

Maisie had read about hedgehogs in story-books but she had never seen a real

one before .

Now her head was full of so many questions.

Why are they called hedgehogs?

Why do they have prickles ?

Why are their legs so short?

What do they eat?

Why do they have such a pointed snout?

What kind of an animal are they?

Maisie picked up the little hedgehog very carefully and do you know what it did?

 

 

Yes! It rolled into a ball. A very prickly ball.

‘Ouch! said Maisie. ‘Now I know why they have prickles. It’s to stop other animals

from catching and eating them!’

Maisie watched the hedgehog for a long time.

She saw it nuzzling the grass with its snout.

‘I wonder what the hedgehog is doing,’ thought Maisie.

‘It looks like it’s searching for something. I wonder what it can be?’

 

Maisie needs some help to find the answers to her other questions.

Can you help her?

Where do you think you can look ?

Try the links below.


http://youtu.be/Llg0jMumwyI

http://www.hedgehogstreet.org/pages/all-about-hedgehogs.html

 

…. and here is a short video of Maisie with the hedgehog.

 

Today is BONFIRE NIGHT in the UK.

A very dangerous day for hedgehogs who like to sleep in piles of leaves and sticks.