Painting with Glue


This is fun for any age and the process can be adapted in so many ways for different effects. It is very versatile and even completely unplanned and random application of the glue by very young children, results in really great abstract pieces of art. (See below). 


The best surface to use is a canvas board but very hard card works well too. 

For small children use a small plastic container of glue which they can squeeze easily. 

In the video I used a cheap set of paints produced for children. 

Better results will be achieved with watercolour and acrylic paints give a stronger colour. 

Glue can be applied to a white board or the board can be painted first and you can use as many layers of glue as you like. 

Watch the video below: 
PAINTING WITH GLUE 


For more Art and Craft ideas and learning videos see my channel:  http://tinyurl.com/funjumbles

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This booklet is for families with young children traveling to the area around Lake Trasimeno and Perugia. It is available in Information Centres, Hotels, Bars and Restaurants around the lake. Free. 

(Email me if you can’t find one: jumblefun@gmail.com)

The booklet is set out like a treasure trail with Lizzie Witch challenging children to find different places and objects in four of the lakeside towns and on the two islands. 

I made it remembering the wonderful family holidays we spent around the lake with our (then) two small daughters and the games we played to take their minds off the heat and to make sightseeing fun. These two small girls are now Mothers themselves but still love to return here. 

Our family holidays were always taken during August and it was always very hot! We found it much more pleasant to play and swim in the mornings and then head off to explore the little towns, villages and the two islands during the afternoons. 

Many, like Castel Rigone are set high on top of hills and are so much cooler than down by the lake. But even the lower set towns with their narrow streets and tall buildings offer lots of welcome shade.  

It has been impossible for me to include all the really beautiful and interesting places to visit. There are just too many! Just the ones that are nearest to Lake Trasimeno. 

In the Playlist ‘I Spy Trasimeno with Lizzie Witch’ you will find lots of videos taken in the places around the lake and some much further afield. Some, presented by my toys, the ‘JUMBLES’ are for young children but there are many ‘General’ ones too. 

I made this booklet initially for our grandchildren but hope that you and your children or grandchildren will have fun using it and that it will make your stay in this magical area even more enjoyable.
Judi Brereton

Email:  jumblefun@gmail.com

http://www.jumblefun.net

Website for learning resources for young children (Art, Craft, Science, Nature and Learning through Play. 
http://www.loveumbria.co.uk

Website about Umbria, it’s places, traditions and festivals. 
http://tinyurl.com/funjumbles 

Channel of programmes, videos and resources for young children
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/jumblefun

Twitter: @JumblesThe

All About Snails for Young Children 

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Gardeners don’t like Snails for obvious reasons but kids are fascinated by them! 

Looking at them through the eyes of a child they are quite incredible creatures with their slippery silver trails and waving tentacles.  What other creature carries its house on its back!  It’s the stuff of fairy tales. 

In the video Lizzie finds a snail eating  her plants and decides to find out how she can stop this happening without hurting the snail. There is also an investigation for parents or teachers to carry out with their children. 

This is the first of two programmes. In the second programme Lizzie will be looking inside the snail shell and exploring spiral shapes in nature and buildings.   There will also be some art activities inspired by spirals. 

Colour Recognition 

Have you ever thought how confusing colours are to a child? 

We accept the many shades of red, of green, of blue but try to look at it through the eyes of a child and you will be surprised! 

We also generalise when describing colours. We say that the sky is blue. That grass is green. That roses are red. REALLY??? 

Then of course there are the very subtle differences between the colours.  For example when does green become yellow? 


When does yellow become orange? 


Yes, learning about colours is difficult. It takes time and experience.

It also requires good observational skills. 

Often a child’s experience of colour is largely confined to the toys they play with.  Toys are usually made from plastic or wood and display a solid colour but children also need to experience natural colours. Colours in nature  are hardly ever solid and so walks in the country and by the sea offer wonderful opportunities to learn about the subtle differences of colour. They also improve observational skills. 

In this story for young children, ‘Jumble Tuft’ learns that sometimes things are not always as they seem and that we often miss the obvious. 

In Search of Blue

Shopping with young children 


Supermarket Shopping with young children is not easy but I found this activity  helped. In addition it improves observational skills and extends vocabulary and understanding. 

Make a card resource of all your usual supermarket items. 

Prior to going to the shops sit down with your child and make a visual card shopping list. It helps to put the cards in isle order..

As an appropriate isle is reached hand two of three of the cards to your child and challenge them to ‘spot’ the items before you do!   Keeping a score of who is winning also shows children that numbers have a practical side. That they are used in real life. 

Very important! 

It is important to establish ground  ‘rules’ before you go shopping.  The best way to do this is to roleplsy and have a few sessions of ‘going shopping’  games.  Try to include positive rather than negative statements. For example instead of saying ‘You mustn’t run’  say ‘please walk down the isles.’ 

For example:

  •  Please walk down the isles. 
  • Please stay near mummy/daddy
  • We must use out quiet voices.
  • Please wait to be told to take the item off the shelf.

Scratch Board Art

 

It’s fun and very compulsive. Just doodling with colour!  It also creates a lot of fine black dust so  cover the table with some newspaper. 

It’s something the youngest child will enjoy although you will probably find they have finished in five minutes whereas you have only just started! 

The general rule is, the younger the child the larger the surface and the sturdier  the tool so something like a spoon  works well as they can grip the bowl and scratch with the edge of the handle. They also need a large piece of board or thick paper and supervision although it’s much more fun and better for them if you do one yourself.

I’d recommend  trying  out different techniques and tools on small pieces of paper before launching on a masterpiece! 

Fun with Ice

Young children are fascinated with ice and will enjoy and learn from this simple activity. It’s a great opportunity to introduce some new vocabulary.   Older children will be fascinated in simply experimenting with a solid block of ice but for twos and threes there is more incentive if you freeze lots of little objects in the ice. Choose a variety. Ones that float and ones that sink. Even little chocolate eggs wrapped in foil work well. This extends the learning.

Freeze the water. Gather together some small containers and fill with salt, food colouring and water and tiny scoops and dropper or syringe. 

When you are ready turn out the ice onto a large tray. Have ready kitchen paper and cloths and protective clothing! 

Of course as soon as small children spot the objects they will want to get them out. Especially the chocolate eggs!  But it’s surprising how long ice takes to melt and young children get bored very quickly! 

That’s where the salt comes in. If salt is sprinkled on followed by food colouring then they will be able to watch while the salt carves out little rivulets in the ice.  It’s a good opportunity to talk about salt and how we sprinkle it on ice paths in the winter.  If you use liquid watercolours in place of food colouring then the variety of colours is extended and you also have a lesson in colour mixing. 

When the fascination wears off they can resort to dripping first cold water and then warm water over the ice. Again lots of opportunities for learning.  

The most important thing is that do everything themselves. Dripping on the colour, sprinkling on the salt. Don’t dictate what they should do,rather ask open ended questions. Questions that motivate. Questions that challenge. You can hide the water until they have experimented with the salt and colours! 

 It may look like a disorganised mess but they ARE learning by playing and observing. Try again in six months and you will see that they tackle the activity differently.  

Why is science important

Why? 


Because young children are naturally curious and science investigations stimulate this natural curiosity. 

Because science answers all those tricky questions about the world around them. 

Because it encourages children to problem solve. To be creative thinkers. To develop a love of learning. 

Because it motivates children to be active not passive. 

Because by engaging in science investigations children learn to challenge what they see and hear rather just acceptngl,

Because they learn that making mistakes is the way to learn. 

Because children learn best through doing. Through play. 

Because it’s FUN! 

You don’t need to be a teacher or have a science degree to engage in science investigations. ‘ Jumble Fun’ has made Science easy and fun for parents and careers too. Resources have been kept to a minimum and can usually be found in your kitchen or bathroom. We suggest watching a programme yourself prior to viewing with your child then you can easily gather th resources together in a bag

The short programmes not only show fun science investigations but suggest ways to adapt the investigation plus extension activities plus it’s all free. 

        Click here to go to the FUN SCIENCE playlist

Why is it important to develop a child’s creativity? 


Why is it important to develop a child’s creative thinking skills? 

Because creative thinking is probably the most important skill they will ever learn!
Developing creative thinking is about developing self esteem and self confidence. It is about developing a love of learning. Of having the means to deal with the confusion, risks and failures that are part of everyday life. The confidence to lead and to be different from the crowd.

I believe that all children are creative by nature but, unfortunately, many lose their creativity before reaching adulthood. In our education and social system where examination success and conformity reigns supreme, creativity seems to have been forgotten.

Creative thinking is vital in all areas of life. It is a skill which will give your children the edge over others in their chosen career enabling them to be the person who initiates new procedures rather than one of the majority who follow already established routines. It opens the door to new opportunities and new inventions.

It also makes a person interesting! Ensures they are never bored ! Someone who is popular socially and is capable of meaningful and long lasting relationships. 

So how do we recognise a creative thinker
A creative thinker is able to think out of the box. They are curious and questioning and not afraid of making crazy suggestions knowing that there may be many possible answers. They make mistakes and learn from these mistakes being happy to try and try again. Creative thinkers don’t feel guilty about daydreaming knowing that often this is when the best ideas are born and when they realise these new ideas they will push them to their limits. They are optimistic, have boundless energy and, despite accomplishing a great deal, still have free time to enjoy their family and hobbies. Last, but not least. They are never bored!

My  Free ‘ Jumble Fun’ learning programme aims at developing creative thinking by: 

Asking Open ended questions

The stories include open ended questions. You are encouraged to ask questions which require more than a ‘yes’ or ‘no’ answer. “What do you think we should use to make …?” “what would happen if …?” “What couid we change…..?

Making choices

The programme encourages children to make their own choices. To make decisions and try them out. If their choices fail to achieve the desired result they are encouraged to try again.  From this they learn to view making mistakes as a new beginning and not as a failure or the end of a 

Story telling and dramatic play

There are opportunities for children to make their own ‘Jumbles’ and to weave stories around them. 

Inventing

The ‘Jumble’ characters enjoy inventing things from well, …… jumble! In other words, from ordinary, everyday household items and objects they can collect in their local environment. Using the characters as inspiration and role models, children will become collectors and inventors, viewing ordinary objects as blank canvasses on which to stamp their own individuality

Fun ! 

The JUMBLES are fun and they encourage your child to have fun being creative and being active rather than passive.  

Enjoy

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