Where do the holes come from? The Science of Bread.

We wanted to know how the holes got into bread so we watched Maisie making a loaf of bread ‘Yummy Good for your Tummy Bread’ and then made some ourselves.

Click here for the video showing how to make the bread

Watching the yeast fermenting and producing all those tiny bubbles is fascinating and children love to have a go kneading the bread dough.

Using fresh yeast to do this makes the science behind bread making much clearer.

After producing a really delicious loaf of bread using Maisie’s instructions we looked at the conditions needed for the yeast to work.

This is what we did:

We put the same amount of yeast in seven dishes.

Dish A … we added sugar.

Dish B … we added cold milk

Dish C … we added warm milk

Dish D …we added sugar and cold milk

Dish E … we added sugar and warm milk

Dish F … we added sugar and very hot milk.

Dish G … just yeast. Nothing added.

Then the children were asked to PREDICT which dish the yeast would work best in.

The dishes were left for 30minutes.

This dish did the best. Which was it? What conclusions did we draw?Well, you need to try the experiment out for yourselves to find out because that is what ‘Jumble Fun’ is all about! Motivating children to be ‘hands on’

A good introduction to the simple science of yeast for very young children can be found on the Jumble Fun in the ‘Science for Kids’ playlist on out channel: http://tinyurl.com/funjumbles

In this programme Lizzie Witch illustrates how to blow up a balloon using yeast

Click here for the yeast and balloon experiment

Crazy Colours

Crazy Colours. A spectacular effect with the minimum or resources and effort! Children love this experiment but do get them to ‘predict’ what they think will happen before adding the soap. Then at the end ask them to think ‘why’ it happened. There is a video giving a simple explanation for them to watch on my channel. It’s called ‘Crazy Colours’ and it is in the FUN SCIENCE playlist. The Jumblefun Channel

I used UHT semi-skimmed milk. A further experiment could be to see if anything different happens when you use full fat or skimmed milk. For a rainbow effect use red, blue and yellow. The soap can be applied by a brush as shown in the video or by finger or cotton wool bud.

Why does it happen?

Although milk is mainly water it does contain lots of other things like vitamins and protein and fat.

Fats and protein are very sensitive to changes in the milk. When soap is added it sends the fat molecules crazy and they all start to twist and turn. During these acrobatics the colour molecules get pushed around so creating the crazy patterns.

Watch the very short video demo below. Have fun!

LINK TO SHORT VIDEO DEMONSTRATION

We’ve been watching an egg cooking.

We’ve been watching a poached egg cooking! Today’s example of an everyday occurrence we take for granted but when watched through the eyes of a child the transformation is magical! ‘How does this happen?’ Most three year olds will appreciate that it’s something to do with hot water.

We’ve no time now but this evening we are going to test that theory by putting one egg into cold water and the other into hot.

The Bouncy Egg

A fun, simple and effective investigation with eggs.

All you need is two eggs, cider or white wine vinegar and two clear containers.

The experiment needs to be left for 18 to 24 hours.

All my programmes are designed to motivate children to ask questions, to predict, to reason.

This video is in two parts. The first explains how to set up the experiment and asks children to predict WHAT they think will happen to the eggs. Then they do the experiment and try to think WHY it happened.

The second part is the explanation put very simply. I suggest you stop the video between the two parts.

Adult supervision is required

Click on this link to watch the video

Cappuccino, Monks and this Gate in Spello

The Cappuccini Gate in Spello.

What’s the connection between this gate in Spello, a cappuccino, an order of monks and Lizzie Witch.

Well, if you are a child it’s all about frothy milk and Lizzie Witch so for children go to the programme here: Frothy milk

If you are an adult then read on!

Around 1520 a friar from Marche in Italy said that God felt that the lifestyle of friars of his day was not that intended by their founder, St. Francis of Assisi and He endeavoured to return to the original primitive lifestyle

The Church tried to surpress this movement and Friar Matteo and his followers had to go into hiding. They were given refuge by the Camaldolese Monks and later adopted the hood or Cappucio worn by that order as a mark of gratitude. From this came the name of the order. Capuchin Momks.

Legend has it that when a Turk army fled after marching on Vienna in 1683 they left lots of sacks of coffee beans behind. The coffee made with these beans was very bitter and so milk and honey was added to make it drinkable. The drink was called Cappucino after the capuchin order of Monks the habits of which also just happened to be the same colours as a Cappuccino.

Above: the road in Spello leading from the Cappuccini Gate.

Learn and have Fun with Bubbles

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Bubbles are so much fun and kids love them. It’s incredible too how often we come into contact with bubbles during our every day lives without even thinking about it. Bread making, whipping up cream, whisking egg whites, fizzy drinks, washing etc etc.

We see them and use them so often that we take them for granted.

But to children , they are MAGIC!

There is so much to be learnt from bubbles but to kids it’s all just good fun. A perfect example of learning through Play.

The theme of one of my learning programmes for preschool children has a theme of Bubbles. If you haven’t watched it yet you can use the link below to view.

BUBBLES. Stories from Jumble House

If you are looking for some more activities on the ‘bubble ‘ theme then here they are! I’ve made short videos on most of the activities so just click on the links to view.

Why are bubbles different colours?
My kids loved this activity!
We half filled a bowl with water and added lots of soap to make masses of strong bubbles. Then we placed our hands under a pile of bubbles and walked around inside and out observing how the colours changed. Children will realise quickly what is happening but they won’t probably know the term ‘reflecting ‘ so this is a good  opportunity to introduce and explain.

Are bubbles always round?



No matter how you try the bubbles you blow will always be round because they are free. There is nothing pushing on them. But, look at the shape of the bubbles on a bubble print. There lots of bubbles are squashed together and so push each other into all kinds of shapes.  Can you make a square bubble?  With a bit of an effort yes!  Learn how on the link below: 

Can you make a square bubble?

Where else do you find bubbles?
Play a game, ‘Spot the Bubbles ‘ . It can last a whole week!
There are bubbles everywhere!

Make some bread.  Yeast produces bubbles when it is given warmth, sugar and liquid. Make some bread using fresh yeast then they can appreciate the process.
Click on the link below the photo to watch how to make delicious ‘ Yummy Srummy Good for my Tummy Bread’!!


Make Bread with Maisie Jumble

Bubbles on the surface of a pond or lake.

Ask questions later like: ‘where do you think they come from?  ‘what is in the water that produces these bubbles? ‘

Click on this link to find out more:  What’s making the bubbles?

Some foods have bubbles.   Just look at a block of Aero chocolate!

Bread. Chocolate Mousse  You can make a fun bubbly jelly too.

So how do we get the air into the liquid?
Here are some good ways to demonstrate this:
Whipping   (cream and egg whites)
Blowing
Steam-like for Cappuccino.
Using a milk frother – .These little milk frothers are really good and providing the milk isn’t too hot Children can make themselves a frothy milk drink.

Bubbles, air and frothy milk 


Early Learning
Of course, while your little ones are discovering bubbles they will also be learning basic scientific and mathematical concepts like temperature, weighing and measuring, density AND accumulating lots of new words.