Experiment with collage

I illustrated my latest book using collage. During the process I changed pictures many times and used different materials until I was happy with the result. This gave me the idea of producing a few activities for children based on this idea. I call it ‘experimental collage’ because the end product isn’t something you can hang on the wall or stick on the fridge. In fact there isn’t an end product! The idea is to create then change the materials and create a different version. I’ve suggested taking photos of each stage. These could be printed out or joined together to make a slideshow. The materials used are everyday objects ….bottle tops, buttons, pasta etc etc. I think this kind of activity is very good for kids. It shows them that there are many possible outcomes. That there’s no ‘right’ or ‘wrong’ and encourages them to be inquisitive. To want to explore and experiment. This video featuring the spider is the first in the series. It’s also the easiest. Future programmes will expect more creativity from the viewer.

Watch on my channel: Spider Collage

Crazy Art

Yesterday I placed an easel outside Jumble House. On it was an example of art produced by blowing paint with a straw. A technique enjoyed by generations of children.

It’s also one of the methods I used to create the illustrations in my book, ‘Roo’s Magic Colours’. This is the story of Rupert (Roo) who loves painting and, through his art , finds a way to make the ‘boring’ everyday tasks like walking the dog and tidying his bedroom a lot more fun! The book links with a playlist by the same name on my channel containing videos showing how to create these pictures.

Today I will replace this illustration with another example from my book, using a different technique.

Here is the link:

Roo’s Magic Colours

Everyday Science

EVERYDAY SCIENCE

Why? How? What if?

We experience the magic of science so many times a day without even thinking about it. To us it is just routine. Part of our everyday life. Very quickly it also becomes routine to a child and then the ‘magic’ is lost and so is a very easy way of absorbing basic science concepts. Things that kids often find boring in a classroom situation at school when introduced at an early age in a 1:1 situation, they are fascinating!

It’s usually the child who asks ‘why?’ but sometimes it’s good to turn the tables!

There’s no need to know the answer either! Brainstorming.Throwing out suggestions, ideas, even funny and silly ones makes learning fun and motivates children to want to find out more.

Examining a dry fresh teabag partly answers the question and is probably sufficient for toddlers. For older children further answers can be found together by watching an age appropriate animation or video on the internet.

WHAT IF?

Prediction is a vital and a fun part of science. It gives us an opportunity to experiment. To investigate and to test out our theories.

What if we used cold water? What do you think would happen? How would it be different?

Then try and find out! I haven’t got the answers on my channel but I have made quite a few programmes to introduce very young children to the magic of science. Try them and if you enjoy please subscribe to my channel. Everything is free. More ideas every day this week.

Make a Snowman Lamp

Make a ⛄️ lamp. Fun, quick and effective. Not quite as quick as this video but there’s a more ‘relaxed’version on my channel to watch with your children or group. I used the inside of a pillow for the snow ❄️ effect. The head is a homemade string bauble but you could use a plastic ball. The ‘lite cube’ is very effective but a led candle would be ok.

Where do the holes come from? The Science of Bread.

We wanted to know how the holes got into bread so we watched Maisie making a loaf of bread ‘Yummy Good for your Tummy Bread’ and then made some ourselves.

Click here for the video showing how to make the bread

Watching the yeast fermenting and producing all those tiny bubbles is fascinating and children love to have a go kneading the bread dough.

Using fresh yeast to do this makes the science behind bread making much clearer.

After producing a really delicious loaf of bread using Maisie’s instructions we looked at the conditions needed for the yeast to work.

This is what we did:

We put the same amount of yeast in seven dishes.

Dish A … we added sugar.

Dish B … we added cold milk

Dish C … we added warm milk

Dish D …we added sugar and cold milk

Dish E … we added sugar and warm milk

Dish F … we added sugar and very hot milk.

Dish G … just yeast. Nothing added.

Then the children were asked to PREDICT which dish the yeast would work best in.

The dishes were left for 30minutes.

This dish did the best. Which was it? What conclusions did we draw?Well, you need to try the experiment out for yourselves to find out because that is what ‘Jumble Fun’ is all about! Motivating children to be ‘hands on’

A good introduction to the simple science of yeast for very young children can be found on the Jumble Fun in the ‘Science for Kids’ playlist on out channel: http://tinyurl.com/funjumbles

In this programme Lizzie Witch illustrates how to blow up a balloon using yeast

Click here for the yeast and balloon experiment

Mrs Spoon

Collecting autumn leaves is fun. They are colourful! Crispy and NOISY!

We love crunching them under our feet and watching them fall from the trees.

I take a magazine out with me and slip the leaves between the pages. That way they don’t get broken on the way home.

Once home I slip the magazine under a rug for a couple of days to flatten the leaves.

Then we’re ready to make our Mrs. Spoon.

Catch them being good

Catch them being good.

You know that great feeling you get when someone says ‘Well done,’ or thanks you for your hard work, or comments on how nice you look or how much they enjoyed your meal? Acknowledgement, positive reinforcement and praise work wonders to raise our self esteem and motivate us to continue.

The same applies to children.

Like us, they need praise.

Too often we tend to comment on the negative behaviour but neglect commenting on the positive. This becomes a downward spiral. Kids want attention and they will find the best way to get it!

If they get more attention by behaving badly then this is what they will continue to do. If they are praised for eating correctly, putting their toys away, not interrupting, sharing, playing quietly etc, then their periods of positive behaviour will increase. It’s hard to apply this method initially but it’s worth it in the long run!

Abstract clock from strips of folded paper. There are paper folding and rolling projects to suit all ages and tastes from simple pencil holders and picture frames to abstract art and clocks. The technique of paper rolling and folding improves coordination and strengthens hand muscles making it a good exercise for young children. With help a four year old will enjoy making simple but attractive and useful pieces. This clock is more of an adult project but you could share the task of making lots of folded paper strips and then the younger members of the family could use some for their own creations while you get on with the clock! I made this clock from torn out pages from some rather dog eared picture books. Pages from any shiny magazine or brochure will work just fine. You could also print out family photos or snaps from a celebration or holiday to make a great ‘memory ‘ clock. The base is a (working) canvas clock which I have fallen out with! The only other requirements are white glue and a pair of scissors. The full video can be found in the Art and Craft playlist on my channel ( click on the link below:

Click here for the video showing you how to make the clock.