Fun with Ice

Young children are fascinated with ice and will enjoy and learn from this simple activity. It’s a great opportunity to introduce some new vocabulary.   Older children will be fascinated in simply experimenting with a solid block of ice but for twos and threes there is more incentive if you freeze lots of little objects in the ice. Choose a variety. Ones that float and ones that sink. Even little chocolate eggs wrapped in foil work well. This extends the learning.

Freeze the water. Gather together some small containers and fill with salt, food colouring and water and tiny scoops and dropper or syringe. 

When you are ready turn out the ice onto a large tray. Have ready kitchen paper and cloths and protective clothing! 

Of course as soon as small children spot the objects they will want to get them out. Especially the chocolate eggs!  But it’s surprising how long ice takes to melt and young children get bored very quickly! 

That’s where the salt comes in. If salt is sprinkled on followed by food colouring then they will be able to watch while the salt carves out little rivulets in the ice.  It’s a good opportunity to talk about salt and how we sprinkle it on ice paths in the winter.  If you use liquid watercolours in place of food colouring then the variety of colours is extended and you also have a lesson in colour mixing. 

When the fascination wears off they can resort to dripping first cold water and then warm water over the ice. Again lots of opportunities for learning.  

The most important thing is that do everything themselves. Dripping on the colour, sprinkling on the salt. Don’t dictate what they should do,rather ask open ended questions. Questions that motivate. Questions that challenge. You can hide the water until they have experimented with the salt and colours! 

 It may look like a disorganised mess but they ARE learning by playing and observing. Try again in six months and you will see that they tackle the activity differently.  

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Floating Eggs

What? Why? How? 

Children need to e challenged not spoon-fed with facts! 

They need to question. To predict. To investigate. This is the first of a series of challenges for children. They are suitable for children from about four years upwards.  Children learn by ‘doing’ and all the challenges are simple enough for them to perform themselves with adult supervision. 

This first challenge is all about floating and density. 

The first video shows the challenge. 

The second video repeats the investigation and then answers the questions. 

My suggestion is that you watch the first video then perform the challenge asking the questions 

Later the second video giving the solutions can be watched.

Melted Crayon Pictures 

A fun and colourful project.  The challenge is choosing the best colours and arranging them to obtain the best effect. How you use the hairdryer and the tilt of the board makes a huge difference to the result . 

It’s a good colour mixing and coordination and thinking project. 

Watch our video :   

Crayon Melting at Jumble House

Materials: 

A good hairdryer …we use one from BOOTS . We reckon that if a hairdryer can withstand daily normal and being  used by Lizzie Witch on a regular basis for a couple of years it must be good! 

Crayons …we used Crayola and Bic crayons . Both are good. Some pictures look better with the paper left on. Others are better when the paper is removed. 

Some card to test out the process before doing the real thing. 

Glue to stick the crayons to the canvas. We used BOSTICK.

Cellotape can be used as an alternative to glue but fiddly.

Canvas boards. 


Suggestions :

Try using card and small bits of crayons for the first few runs.  This is cheaper and will enable the child to see what happens and to decide which colours to use and how to arrange them.

Don’t overdo the hairdryer bit! Kids will want to carry on and on until every bit of crayon has gone but as in a lot of art, less is best!  But it’s a good idea to let them have their own way during a practice run on card!  Learning from your own mistakes is the best way and hopefully they will see that controlled melting is more effective. You could suggest trying both and then comparing the results. 

Ask them to predict what they think will happen. Which colours will mix? What colours will this make?  What will happen if you point the hairdryer sideways?  What will happen if you point the hairdryer over the top of the crayons? 

More Ideas:

  • Make the melted crayon look like a tree full of dripping blossom ….you can paint or stick a tree trunk on the canvas before melting the crayons. 
  • Make a picture of someone blowing bubbles ..a few grated bits added helps.
  • Make the melts look like rain …draw or stick a person with an umbrella on the board.
  • A fountain 
  • A waterfall 
  • A bonfire. 

Practicalities:

The crayons do splatter  a little so do cover tables well or do outside using an extension lead. 

This is a project for children old enough to hold a hairdryer confidently. Probably around 7 years and up. As with all of the Jumble Fun projects, adult supervision is advised

An adult will be needed to cut the crayons in half unless you use a big canvas board and then they can be stuck on intact.  

The video is fun to watch and shows the basic process. Use it as a stepping stone from which the child can develop their own ideas. 

Click on the link below to watch the Sunday Challenge in Jumble House: 

Melted Crayon Picture Challenge from the JUMBLES

Flying Machines 

Part one of the Sunday Challenge programmes on flying machines.

Did you know that the first plane with an engine was a biplane ? 

Bi Planes are planes with two wings, one over the other.  They have very good uplift but the ‘drag’ is much greater than with the more  modern planes so they are much slower.  The very first plane with an engine was a BiPlane. 

Freddie Jumble is very interested in planes and so is Judi. Her father was in the airforce and later in the Royal Observer Corps. 


As a child she learnt how to recognise lots of aeroplanes and later Judi learnt how to fly gliders. ( planes without engines) . 

Here she is at the controls. 


Watch the video to see how to make your very own model : Flying Machines. Bi Planes

Story Starters

How are you getting on with your story?

Stuck?

Thinking of that first line for your story is often the hardest part!

Here are some of the ideas the Jumbles have thought of:

An action starter.

Bertie Banana slid down his water slide straight into ……..

Sally Strawberry was so busy listening to her music that she didn't notice the giant hole in the road and ….

Pedro Pear was practising his boxing when …..

A character starter.

Lizzie Lemon was very forgetful. She forgot birthdays. She forgot where she was going. She even forgot …

Georgie Garlic was always playing tricks on his friends. One day …….

Mushy was a very clumsy mushroom.

A question

Have you ever wondered what …..?

What do you think happens when the lights go out in ……?

Guess what Mushy Mushroom caught in his fishing net ?

What do you think Potty Potato found when he was digging his garden?

Time

One day when Matty Melon was playing table-tennis he saw ……

Yesterday was a particularly bad day for Arthur Apple.

Last night a strange thing happened in the vegetable patch .

 

See you on Sunday !!

 

 

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