Painting with Glue


This is fun for any age and the process can be adapted in so many ways for different effects. It is very versatile and even completely unplanned and random application of the glue by very young children, results in really great abstract pieces of art. (See below). 


The best surface to use is a canvas board but very hard card works well too. 

For small children use a small plastic container of glue which they can squeeze easily. 

In the video I used a cheap set of paints produced for children. 

Better results will be achieved with watercolour and acrylic paints give a stronger colour. 

Glue can be applied to a white board or the board can be painted first and you can use as many layers of glue as you like. 

Watch the video below: 
PAINTING WITH GLUE 


For more Art and Craft ideas and learning videos see my channel:  http://tinyurl.com/funjumbles

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Scratch Board Art

 

It’s fun and very compulsive. Just doodling with colour!  It also creates a lot of fine black dust so  cover the table with some newspaper. 

It’s something the youngest child will enjoy although you will probably find they have finished in five minutes whereas you have only just started! 

The general rule is, the younger the child the larger the surface and the sturdier  the tool so something like a spoon  works well as they can grip the bowl and scratch with the edge of the handle. They also need a large piece of board or thick paper and supervision although it’s much more fun and better for them if you do one yourself.

I’d recommend  trying  out different techniques and tools on small pieces of paper before launching on a masterpiece! 

Crayon Melt Fun


Melting crayon art is not just for older children.

With support even toddlers will be able to produce fun pictures and they will also learn a little about melting and colour mixing. 

A Small, light hairdryer, a canvas board and a few crayons are all that is needed.

I’ve found that keeping the paper on the crayons and sticking them to the board makes the job much more manageable for Tinies. Then they, and you, can concentrate on the important part – the melting.  Cellotape or glue can be used to secure the crayons. 

 Make sure surfaces are protected! It can be messy! 

The idea is to keep the hairdryer pointing downwards onto the crayon. Tilt the board slightly.  When the crayon first starts to melt it sprays a little in all directions and then will start to trickle downwards .  Once there is a stream of each colour then the fun begins!  The board can be tilted in different directions so causing the colour  streams to cross and mix. 

Once the child is familiar with the technique it’s  fun to experiment. Obstacles can be stuck on the board to send the melted crayon in different directions or a picture can be painted on the hoard beforehand so the melted crayon looks like a fountain or fire or volcano.  

 Above:  a card cut out can be glued to the board so the crayon covers the cutout making it look like the little people are under a multicoloured fountain.  

Less is best! Children usually want to keep going and going until all the crayon has melted and mixed.  The result? Usually a muddy mess! Should you stop them? No!  We know that mixing too many colours together makes well, a pretty yuck colour. They don’t! 

It’s much better for them to find out themselves.  This is the way they learn.  


What you can do is to suggest taking photos at different stages and then discussing them later.  Which did they like best? Which colours worked best?  How would they change what they did? Would using fewer colours be best! 

With a toddler I would suggest using very small. Rayons or break longer ones in half.  That way the melting time is halved and the mess! 

The video below is a fun introduction for very young children to crayon melting. 

FUN CRAYON MELTING 

Below: grated crayons! 


Another fun way with crayon melts. 

This works well with a simple black or grey painting or drawing on canvas. Here we’ve used trees. 

Grate the choice of crayons onto newspaper. Place the canvas picture (face side down) on top of the crayons. Then blow hot air at the underside of the canvas.

Butterflies and Chromatography 

Chromatography is a big word but it simply means splitting something down into its basic components. So milk is milk but it’s components are fat, sugar, protein, water etc. 

In the same way but MUCH more fun, we can split colours down into their basic pigments. 

Sounds complicated but it’s a piece of cake!  A,fun activity that even a preschool,child will enjoy (always supervised, of course) . 

Watch the video and you will see! 

Keppel Centre for Art Education 

The National Kitchen Restaurant

Yesterday following a delicious meal in the exquisite  ‘National Kitchen’ restaurant in the Singapore National Gallery we stumbled on a really fun activity area called ‘Who’s in the Wood’. I’m not sure who enjoyed it most. Our two year old granddaughter or the adults in the party! 


Click here to see more:  ​​​​Who’s in the Woods?

​When we were able to tear ourselves away from ‘We were in for another amazing discovery. The ‘Keppel Centre for Art Education’ 
On the first level of the Gallery, this imaginative Centre for children is made up of four areas. The Art Playscape, Art Corridor, Museum and Project Gallery. The activities and resources encourage children to think creatively, to problem solve and to communicate.  In other words, everything that ‘The Jumbles’ believe in. 

This is such a wonderful learning resource for residents in Singapore but a visit to the National Gallery including the Keppel Centre (and a meal in the’National Kitchen’ ) is also something I would rate as a ‘must’ for families visiting the country. 

For more information and amazing photographs, click on the link below. 

      Keppel Centre

Crayon Melt Pictures 

These are really fun to make and introduce the concept of ‘melting’ to children. 

The technique also improves coordination. 

All you need is a small Canvas board, a pack of crayons. Some glue and a hairdryer. 

The fun video featuring Lizzie Witch attempting to melt the crayons is sure to motivate children to ‘have a go!’ 

Adult supervision and help is needed . 

Click on this link to watch the video 

For lots more art and science activities visit our channel: 

The Jumble Fun Channel of Videos 

Flower Power

 

Photo-20160205093448820.jpg

Play dough, bought or homemade, is a great creative medium. Modelling with the dough also strengthens little muscles thus improving fine motor skills. 


Introduce different skills like: 

  • Kneading
  • Squeezing
  • Rolling a long sausage on the table first with one hand and then both 
  • Rolling into a ball between the palms of both hands.
  • Breaking the play dough-pulling it apart using a tripod grip. 
  • Squashing balls on the table with the thumb and then each finger in turn. 
  • Building a tower or balls starting with the largest at the bottom. 

I drew patterns and pictures in indelible marker on clear plastic to encourage my kids to use different skills to make different shapes with the playdough. (See above) 

Follow the link below to see Maisie Jumble , inspired by the fibreglass sculptures by Ana Tzaievi , making her own from play dough.

Video link below: 

        FLOWER POWER

Autumn Leaves. Sunday Challenge

There are SO many things you can do with Autumn leaves! 

Preparation 

It’s a good idea to take an old book out with you when you go collecting because fallen leaves curl up very quickly. If you take a book then you can slip the leaves between the pages.  Then, on returning home, the book can be placed under something heavy or between other books on the bookshelf until you are ready the use the leaves. 

On today’s programme (click on the link below) you will see how to make models and pictures and a lantern but there are lots more things you can do and there will be more ideas in our next programme.
                        Click here for the AUTUMN LEAVES programme


How to tie-dye and paint on fabric .  Making animals from fir-cones


The Activities are designed for families to enjoy together. 

Today its possible for every member of the family to enjoy one of the activities.  Even a toddler can dab a bit of fabric into different colours and teenagers can experiment with using different techniques perhaps as a base for a textile project.

Children should always be supervised but then I believe that it’s so important that your kids see you enjoying participating in the activities and it’s so much more fun than just standing there making sure they don’t hurt themselves!
Try to prompt with open questions rather than saying ‘It will work better if you do this..’.

Your participation motivates and encourages them and they also see that making mistakes is part of the learning process. That you become more determined to get it right next time. Not to sulk and give up!



Today Alfie shows us the models he has made from Fir-cones and Georgie demonstrates how to do tie-dye and silk painting. She has experimented with using food colouring in place of proper fabric dyes and they worked great! Georgie and Maisie have made scarves out of the large pieces of fabric . They used the small silk samples to dress some spoon people. 

Warnings:
Food, colouring stains everything especially fingers and it’s a devil to wash off som gloves and protective clothing are the order of the day!

An iron will be required so obviously adults need to take over here or, with older children it is a good introduction providing they are supervised. You never know maybe the boys will progress to ironing their own shirts!!

The  use of food colouring was effective and so much cheaper . It offers children the opportunity to try out lots of different techniques without spending a bomb!

We rinsed our samples quickly before drying and ironing and the colour stayed well but I don’t think it would be any good for items that needed to be washed properly.

The challenge this week is to find out what happens to fir cones when it rains. Also why? We are going to make a weather station at Jumble House.
Maybe you can do too!

Click on the link below to view the programme: 

                    Today’s Sunday Challenge Programme
I really enjoy what I do and hope you do too so please leave a comment if you have enjoyed today’s post and video programme. 

It would  also be great if you could subscribe to my channel. 

Our email address is : Email address

I’d love to receive photos of models or print samples that your children have made following this programme at home or at school. Only their first name would be published. Nothing else. 

Thanks for visiting .

Bye for now.

Judi and the Jumbles.


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