Autumn Leaves. Sunday Challenge

There are SO many things you can do with Autumn leaves!

Preparation 

It’s a good idea to take an old book out with you when you go collecting because fallen leaves curl up very quickly. If you take a book then you can slip the leaves between the pages.  Then, on returning home, the book can be placed under something heavy or between other books on the bookshelf until you are ready the use the leaves.

On today’s programme (click on the link below) you will see how to make models and pictures and a lantern but there are lots more things you can do and there will be more ideas in our next programme.

                        Click here for the AUTUMN LEAVESg programme


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Fun shape Art and Maths activity

Young children are naturally creative and love drawing and painting and making things.

They will enjoy the activity shown in the video above and learn some new shape and size  vocabulary at the same time.,

Recognising shapes within objects  improves observational skills and is a good grounding for drawing and sketching. 

Although designed for preschool aged children this activity can be adapted to suit any age depending on the chosen object.

Paint-Blob Art

Fun Art with Paint Blobs and Straw

All kids love blowing Blobs of paint or ink into shapes with a straw but this Programne takes the technique one step further. 

A great project for all ages. Tinies to adults. Just adapt to suit the age. 


Suggestions:

Animals : dogs, peacocks,, roosters, porcupine, 

People,

Monsters. 

Trees with blossom 

Spooky forests

A witch or witches cauldron. 

Night sky with shooting stars or galaxy. 

Visit our Channel for more Art and Craft, Fun Science and Learning activities for Under-Fives.

Click here to go to the Fun Jumbles Channel

Painting with Glue


This is fun for any age and the process can be adapted in so many ways for different effects. It is very versatile and even completely unplanned and random application of the glue by very young children, results in really great abstract pieces of art. (See below). 


The best surface to use is a canvas board but very hard card works well too. 

For small children use a small plastic container of glue which they can squeeze easily. 

In the video I used a cheap set of paints produced for children. 

Better results will be achieved with watercolour and acrylic paints give a stronger colour. 

Glue can be applied to a white board or the board can be painted first and you can use as many layers of glue as you like. 

Watch the video below: 
PAINTING WITH GLUE 


For more Art and Craft ideas and learning videos see my channel:  http://tinyurl.com/funjumbles

Scratch Board Art

 

It’s fun and very compulsive. Just doodling with colour!  It also creates a lot of fine black dust so  cover the table with some newspaper. 

It’s something the youngest child will enjoy although you will probably find they have finished in five minutes whereas you have only just started! 

The general rule is, the younger the child the larger the surface and the sturdier  the tool so something like a spoon  works well as they can grip the bowl and scratch with the edge of the handle. They also need a large piece of board or thick paper and supervision although it’s much more fun and better for them if you do one yourself.

I’d recommend  trying  out different techniques and tools on small pieces of paper before launching on a masterpiece! 

Crayon Melt Fun


Melting crayon art is not just for older children.

With support even toddlers will be able to produce fun pictures and they will also learn a little about melting and colour mixing. 

A Small, light hairdryer, a canvas board and a few crayons are all that is needed.

I’ve found that keeping the paper on the crayons and sticking them to the board makes the job much more manageable for Tinies. Then they, and you, can concentrate on the important part – the melting.  Cellotape or glue can be used to secure the crayons. 

 Make sure surfaces are protected! It can be messy! 

The idea is to keep the hairdryer pointing downwards onto the crayon. Tilt the board slightly.  When the crayon first starts to melt it sprays a little in all directions and then will start to trickle downwards .  Once there is a stream of each colour then the fun begins!  The board can be tilted in different directions so causing the colour  streams to cross and mix. 

Once the child is familiar with the technique it’s  fun to experiment. Obstacles can be stuck on the board to send the melted crayon in different directions or a picture can be painted on the hoard beforehand so the melted crayon looks like a fountain or fire or volcano.  

 Above:  a card cut out can be glued to the board so the crayon covers the cutout making it look like the little people are under a multicoloured fountain.  

Less is best! Children usually want to keep going and going until all the crayon has melted and mixed.  The result? Usually a muddy mess! Should you stop them? No!  We know that mixing too many colours together makes well, a pretty yuck colour. They don’t! 

It’s much better for them to find out themselves.  This is the way they learn.  


What you can do is to suggest taking photos at different stages and then discussing them later.  Which did they like best? Which colours worked best?  How would they change what they did? Would using fewer colours be best! 

With a toddler I would suggest using very small. Rayons or break longer ones in half.  That way the melting time is halved and the mess! 

The video below is a fun introduction for very young children to crayon melting. 

FUN CRAYON MELTING 

Below: grated crayons! 


Another fun way with crayon melts. 

This works well with a simple black or grey painting or drawing on canvas. Here we’ve used trees. 

Grate the choice of crayons onto newspaper. Place the canvas picture (face side down) on top of the crayons. Then blow hot air at the underside of the canvas.

Butterflies and Chromatography 

Chromatography is a big word but it simply means splitting something down into its basic components. So milk is milk but it’s components are fat, sugar, protein, water etc. 

In the same way but MUCH more fun, we can split colours down into their basic pigments. 

Sounds complicated but it’s a piece of cake!  A,fun activity that even a preschool,child will enjoy (always supervised, of course) . 

Watch the video and you will see! 

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